Gujaratis have had a long involvement with the British.

The original East India Company set up a factory in the port city of Surat in Gujarat in 1615.

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Both Hindus and Muslims have established caste or community associations, temples, and mosques to cater for the needs of their respective communities.

A well known temple popular with Gujaratis is the BAPS Swaminarayan Temple in Neasdon, London.

Gujaratis have achieved a high demographic profile in many urban districts worldwide, notably in India Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, in the New York City Metropolitan Area, United States, as large-scale immigration from India continues into New York, The United States has the third-largest Gujarati population after the United Kingdom.

The highest concentration of the population of over 100,000 is in the New York City Metropolitan Area alone, notably in the growing Gujarati diasporic center of India Square in Jersey City, New Jersey, and Edison in Middlesex County in Central New Jersey.

Early European travelers like Ludovico di Varthema (15th century) traveled to Gujarat and wrote on the people of Gujarat.

He noted that Jainism had a strong presence in Gujarat and opined that Gujaratis were deprived of their kingdom by Mughals because of their kind heartedness.

His description of Gujaratis was:...a certain race which eats nothing that has blood, never kills any living things... if they were baptized, they would all be saved by the virtue of their works, for they never do to others what they would not do unto them.

and for its institution of Nagarsheth ("head of the guild assembly"); a 16th-century Mughal system akin to medieval European guilds which self-regulated the mercantile affairs of multi-ethnic, multi-religious communities in the Gujarati bourgeoisie long before municipal state politics was introduced.

Most were, however, eventually admitted on the basis of a Quota voucher system or, in case of Uganda, as refugees after the expulsion order by the Ugandan ruler, Idi Amin in August 1972.