it’s about social skills, learning how to communicate with different people, and figuring out what you want and what you like. Basically, a date in the regular world isn’t a job interview. I ended up with some great male friends from my dating days.

If you find someone with whom you click, you can then gradually (or rapidly) move towards exclusiveness, depending on your/their desire. I can’t say that about the LDS world, and if it weren’t for my rather exceptional experience in other contexts, I doubt I would *have* any male LDS friends.

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A woman friend related this experience from her time in YW: “One of my old advisers gave the entire YW the following advice: Just remember when you start dating someone that you’re either going to get married or break up.

Those are the only two options at the beginning of a new relationship.

For myself, I was in relationships for a lot of my 20s and early 30s, not very seriously and usually breaking up amicably.

And Mormons are by no means the only ones to date-to-marry.

Let’s face it, there aren’t that many women I want to make babies with, but lots of women are interesting, outstanding people, and I’m glad they’re my friends.

I wish I had figured this out a long time ago.” A woman friend deftly summarized that “dating would be a lot less painful if we thought of it as getting to know human beings instead of evaluating gametes.” I asked another woman (a single established professional) her impressions about the Mormon singles scene outside the Mormon corridor.

Two siblings, practically in elderly status (~30) are single and neither has had a serious boyfriend/girlfriend.

A close friend from his youth married a short time ago, his new wife was his first serious relationship in over a decade.

If it’s broad enough to be a cultural phenomenon, there needs to be lots of somethings that need changing, starting at the top and extending downward.