Since graduating with a degree in biology, Lisa Magloff has worked in many countries.

Accordingly, she specializes in writing about science and travel and has written for publications as diverse as the "Snowmass Sun" and "Caterer Middle East." With numerous published books and newspaper and magazine articles to her credit, Magloff has an eclectic knowledge of everything from cooking to nuclear reactor maintenance.

They have a duty to protect you from harassment from anyone you come into contact with for your job, not just their employees.

If they do nothing about it, file a claim with the EEOC.

Dana Brownlee, president of professional training development company Professionalism Matters, advises against initiating a romance with your manager, or, likewise, with anyone who reports to you directly or indirectly."If you're a manager, you should be held to a higher standard," she says.

"You're creating a climate where people are going to see bias whether there really is bias or not."Relationships with your peers are generally more acceptable—assuming they're unhitched.

To avoid this, companies institute various types of dating policy.

No-dating policies generally ban dating between a supervisor and their subordinate.

And a whopping 31% of office relationships result in marriage—meaning they can't always be a bad idea, right?

Here's how to make sure pursuing love won't cost you your job: Avoid Getting Involved with the Wrong Person According to the Career Builder survey, 24% of intra-office relationships were with someone higher up in the organization.

With this type of policy, the employees would also have to notify you whenever a relationship ends.