If you’re feeling unsure about how to teach your teen to distinguish between a healthy and unhealthy relationship, or if you would like additional resources on the warning signs of relationship abuse or promoting positive relationships, consider visiting

It’s tough to know when to set rules and when to give freedom, when to bend and when to stand firm, when to intervene and when to let live.

Communication is often one of the trickiest minefields to navigate.

While it may be tempting to skip this conversation, it’s in everyone’s best interests to talk to your teen about sex.

Ask yourself whether you want your teen to hear this information from you or someone else.

Tell your teen you can drop off or pick up him or her, lend a compassionate and supportive ear when necessary, or help acquire birth control if that fits with your parenting and personal philosophies.

However you intend to support your teen, make sure he or she knows that you are available.Infatuation may give us butterflies, goose bumps, and that “can’t eat, can’t sleep” type of feeling, but it isn’t the same as love.Love takes time to grow, whereas infatuation may happen almost instantly.On its website, the Mayo Clinic suggests turning the topic into a discussion rather than a presentation.Be sure to get your teen’s point of view and let your teen hear all sides from you. Talk about questions of ethics, values, and responsibilities associated with personal or religious beliefs.Explain that a healthy relationship comes from respect, mutual understanding, trust, honesty, communication, and support.