Since the development of the Italian film industry in the early 1900s, Italian filmmakers and performers have, at times, experienced both domestic and international success, and have influenced film movements throughout the world.As of 2014, Italian films have won 14 Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, the most of any country, as well as 12 Palmes d'Or, the second-most of any country.One of the first cinematic avante-garde movements, Italian Futurism, took place in Italy in the late 1910s.

The picture is about a cluster of night-shift cleaners working for a film studio in Turin, most of them are immigrants, ranges from India - the good-hearted family man Dilip (D' Souza), East Europe - the brain of the group Mako (Guskov) to Central Africa - the bossy grump Zahur (Ebouaney) and the voluptuous seducer Laloo (Gerren), in addition to the natives, an unhappy spinster Gina (Catalano), a torpid wife Charlotte (Kravos) and a carefree youngster Ben (Venitucci) who is congenitally romantic but when comes to the critical moment he gets cold feet.

So the moonlighting business of these laymen starts with clandestinely borrowing the studio cameras to shoot wedding videos on weekends, then evolves into a more audacious plan, hogging the studio during the night to make short films for their sundry clients under the brand "Italian Movies", most of the videos they make are talking heads with shoddy CGI backgrounds, pertinent to the needs of their patrons, outlandish but never inspirational, so what is the endgame of the big subterfuge?

Post-World War II Italy saw the rise of the influential Italian neorealist movement, which launched the directorial careers of Luchino Visconti, Roberto Rossellini, and Vittorio De Sica.

Neorealism declined in the late 1950s in favor of lighter films, such as those of the Commedia all'italiana genre and important directors like Federico Fellini and Michelangelo Antonioni.

Gandolfini has a bit part as Angelo, a sleazy gangster.

When Caterina accepts a job offer in a Hotel in Belgrade, her three friends decide to follow her despite their problems, starting an on the road adventure which will mark a turning point in their lives.

The French Lumière brothers commenced public screenings in Italy in 1896: in March 1896, in Rome and Milan; in April in Naples, Salerno and Bari; in June in Livorno; in August in Bergamo, Bologna and Ravenna; in October in Ancona; and in December in Turin, Pescara and Reggio Calabria.

Lumière trainees produced short films documenting everyday life and comic strips in the late 1890s and early 1900s.

Pioneering Italian cinematographer Filoteo Alberini patented his "Kinetograph" during this period.