Just under 200,000 whites are involved in interracial marriages every year in the US, analysis of Pew Research Center figures (in turn based on US Census Bureau and American Community Survey data) has revealed.

Of the 2,096,000 marriages in the US in 2010, some 275,500 were interracial—and of that number, 192,850 involved white partners, male or female.

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(Information on 34- to 35-year-olds was not available for this period.)While Hispanic is an ethnic group composed of both racial and ethnic groups, Joyner, like many demographers, uses the categories -- non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black (or African-American) and Hispanic (or Latino) -- to measure race.

In Joyner's study, Hispanics had the highest rate of interracial relationships: 45 percent of 18- to 19-year-olds and 33 percent of 24- to 25-year-olds were in interracial relationships in the early 2000s, compared with blacks (20 and 14 percent, respectively) and whites (16 and 12 percent, respectively).

To explore the changing patterns of interracial sexual relationships during the transition to adulthood, Joyner and her co-author, Grace Kao, associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the National Health and Social Life Survey, some of the first nationally representative surveys to collect information on sexual relationships."Studying trends in interracial sexual relationships is important because intimate relationships between different racial groups are viewed as an indicator of the social and geographic distance between racial groups, and a barometer of race relations," said Joyner.

Unlike other studies, which typically look at marriage or cohabitation and sometimes at current dating relationships, this study looked at trends in these relationships over a 10-year period.

Hispanics and Asians remained the likeliest to marry outside their race, and the increasing number of interracial marriages mostly reflects those groups’ larger share of the general population.

The total number of Americans who listed their ethnicity as “mixed race” was just under 9 million in 2010. ’’: Marital Instability Among Interracial and Same-Race Couples” 57 (April 2008), 160–171) found that according “to the adjusted models predicting divorce as of their 10th year of marriage, interracial marriages that are most vulnerable involve White females and non-White males (with the exception of White females/Hispanic White males) relative to White/White couples.

Interracial marriages have increased steadily since then.

In 2013, a record-high 12% of newlyweds married someone of a different race, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.

While Asians appear to be comparable to Hispanics in terms of rates of interracial involvement, age patterns for Asians were not presented in the study, Joyner said, because there were so few within some of the age groups in the surveys."In the analyses we did run, however, it looks like involvement in interracial relationships increases with age for Asians," said Joyner."Although interracial relationships were far more common in the early part of this decade than in the mid-1990s -- about five percentage points higher -- they still decline with age," said Joyner, noting that the fact that many young adults' transition to marriage is also a factor in the age decline. In a 2003 study, Joyner had reported that adolescents in interracial romances were significantly less willing to reveal their relationship to family and close friends than those in same-race relationships, suggesting that such relationships still do not receive whole-hearted approval by society.

The rate of interracial marriage, however, is still relatively uncommon: in 2002, only 2.9 percent of all marriages were interracial, according to the U. The study was supported, in part, by grants from Mc Gill University, Cornell, the University of Pennsylvania and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The study found that in total, 8.4 percent of all current U. marriages are interracial, up from 3.2 percent in 1980.