And, no, it’s not the mostly male colleges where the hookup culture reigns supreme. Because the way today’s heterosexual college students describe sex and dating at their own schools matches up with the scholarly research on gender ratios and how they affect behavior.

Just as sex-ratio research predicts, it is the colleges with male-heavy gender ratios where dating is more traditional.

Here’s what had to say Georgia Tech, which is 66% male: “Tech is a fairly monogamous campus [and] people like to be in a relationship.” At 59%-male California Institute of Technology, “Students tend not to date but have relationships…

According to Niche, “The same girls that run in the social hookup circles on Friday night are taking you to church with them on Sunday.

The guys practice the requisite Christian business principles, but blow through the Baylor babes that are in endless supply.”Of course, for some young men and women, casual sex is part of college life’s appeal, and for them a 60%-female school might be a good fit.

The problem, based on research and interviews I conducted for DATE-ONOMICS, is that few applicants appreciate the extent to which gender ratios shape the dating cultures at their chosen schools.

This lack of transparency can be especially problematic for women because, according to a study authored by five Loyola Marymount psychologists, college women are twice as likely as college men to experience distress after hookups.

This study assessed female college students’ (N = 197) participation in dating, romantic relationships, hooking up behaviors, and the intersection of these activities.

Hooking up was prevalent among students (n = 78; 39.6%), but dating (n = 139; 70.6%) and romantic relationship (n = 147; 74.6%) involvement were even more prevalent.

“One of my friends was dumped by a guy after they’d been hooking up for less than a week.