This development was in response to baroque and rococo architecture and design, which required much more elaborate furniture and moldings.Therefore, woodworkers needed much more complicated tools.

A British plane, also called a chariot plane, is a forerunner to the block plane and is popular with collectors since no two castings are alike.

Japanese and Chinese planes different from Western planes in that a user pulls the plane toward himself.

By 1900, Stanley dominated the market, often by buying out competitors. A fore plane or try plane, 18 to 22 inches, is used between the jack and jointer, and is the one a workman was most likely to forgo.

Other plane trade names and manufacturers included Bailey, “B-Plane” by Birmingham, Chaplin, Gage, Keen Kutter, Ohio, Sargent, Siegley, Standard Rule, Union, and Winchester. A jointer plane, 22 to 30 inches long, is used to prepare the long straight edges of a piece of wood prior to jointing them.

Such tools from this period—surviving examples tend to be from Holland, Germany, or Austria—are highly prized by collectors.

It wasn’t until the late 17th century that the making of planes became an acknowledged trade.

Even in the 19th century, plow planes, the most treasured plane in a woodworker’s kit, were purchased for show, particularly those made of exotic woods like boxwood, rosewood, and ebony, with ivory for the locking nuts and arm tips. Stanley’s metal bench planes were first numbered based on size—the No.1 was 5 ½ inches, the No. Many of the company’s planes and tools became standard for every woodworker’s tool kit, including the No.

80 scrapper (used to give wood a glass-like surface), and the classic No.

Interestingly, the planes that were dismissed as most useless by woodworkers are the ones that are the most valuable to contemporary collectors, as they were only produced for around 15 years as opposed to the 60 or 70 year run of a normal Stanley product. Some planes like circular or compass planes have curved soles to carve curved surfaces, while still other planes like molding or shoulder planes make steps (called rabbets or rebates), bevels or chamfers, window sashes, door panels, convex, concave, and beaded molding patterns, and jointing features like dadoes, tongues, grooves, mortises, and dovetails.